In recent months, I have found myself in conversations with business leaders about getting to “Yes.” There seems to be an increased number

of people regardless of industry that are in discussions that include

“no, no thank you,” “not right now,” or “maybe in a few weeks/months.”

Often, it is not related to a sale but rather collaborating on an idea or initiative that will be win-win for both parties. Based on the number of “no’s” we hear in a day week or month, we begin to forget a fundamental concept…we forget to ask!

Sometimes when we ask for help or share an idea we will most often hear “YES.” It is a great connector!

Hearing yes, fuels our creativity and provides the encouragement to think outside the box. I believe, when we hear yes it actually engages the happiness hormones that creates positive energy and just plain makes us feel good.

There are four hormones that contribute to happiness or fulfillment and they are: dopamin, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins. All of these are naturally created in the body and are engaged when we feel happy, satisfied, and appreciated. They work in tandem with one another and are obviously created when we exercise, eat healthy and I believe hear “yes.”

As a graduate from Harvard Law School Negotiation Institute, I remember a similar conversation with colleagues and reading an article on the power of getting to yes, especially when negotiating.

After all, isn’t almost every conversation we have part of that process?

Here are a few suggestions found in a recent article in the Harvard Business Review when looking for yes:

  1. Separate the people from the problem
  2. Focus on interests, not positions
  3. Learn to manage emotions
  4. Express appreciation
  5. Put a positive spin on your message
  6. Escape the cycle of action and reaction

I will take this advice one step further and suggest that we end a conversation that will ultimately include yes so that we leave a connection on a positive note that will leave the door open for the future.

After all, isn’t that why we connected with someone in the first place?

We are all interested in collaborating and getting to “yes.”

Trish Tonaj is an author, coach and speaker sharing stories on mentorship
while creating a culture of wealth and wellbeing. She is the author of Breaking Barriers 10 Entrepreneurial Women Share Their Stories and A Diary of Change 12 Personal Tools and W2, Wealth and Wellbeing.

Visit Trish @ www.phaze2wellness.com

 

Reference Article:
Six Guidelines for “Getting to Yes”
by Katie Shonk – HBR July 17, 2018